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Hydroponic Tulips… Winter and Spring

January 12th, 2007

It may be January, but I’m already thinking of Spring.  Found a neat “hydroponic tulip jar” at a local big-box store… just what we needed to brighten up the room.  The Poinsettia (interesting plant!) will show its colors for many months, but becomes more of a remembrance of earlier holiday spirit .  The Tulips also bring memories… living in the northwest with palettes of color among homes and the earth; Seen from the air the fields are beautifully painted with bright colors through the efforts of tulip farmers.  The annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival is a wonderous sight (and recommended for a spring trip!).  The festival this year occurs for the entire month of April with “bloom dates according to mother nature.” A little later in the month is better if I remember correctly. The Tulips in the jar are getting ready to bloom- yes, forced to bring an early Spring to the household… but welcomed nonetheless.  What a great idea for hydroponic tulips… just add water every couple days and they grow like crazy.  Tried planting over 50 tulip bulbs outside a few years ago at another place… couldn’t wait for them to bloom. Each morning however, I walked around to see little holes where the bulbs used to be!  “Who is stealing my tulip bulbs,” I thought. Seems that rabbits love to dig up and eat the little suckers.  Now we enjoy the daffodils since they apparently don’t taste very good!  Guess they don’t have as many rabbits in the northwest.

The winter has been warmer this year, yet the firewood is stacked for the warmth the woodstove provides on colder days and nights.  How comforting to have the wood split and ready to warm the house!  Someone is probably thinking… “Yes, warmer winters… global warming… and you’re burning firewood!”  Ah well… a warm fire reaches deep within the soul… bringing some kind of innate satisfaction and comfort.  And I can feel good about the “EPA certified” woodstove with “non-catalytic reburning technology.”  Huh?  All I know is that there’s a roaring fire in the dang thing and you can hardly see any smoke coming out the chimney!  Apparently it reburns most of the pollutants and if that’s helping the environment, well I’m glad.  I think it’s more tangible to appreciate that we don’t have smoke pouring in and around the house so much! Of course then there’s the old stove in the barn, yet to be fired up, the tractor, the assorted small engines… evolution and technology are meeting, yet slowly.  But a little tinge of woodsmoke triggers something within as well, and when working outside lets one know there’s a warm place to come back to.  Mom remembers the saying “Wood warms you twice!” referring to the cutting/stacking and burning.  Well this year I took down an old 80′ Red Oak, and lost count of how many times it warmed me! but that’s another story… :)

Tulips, Poinsettia and Firewood

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