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Dragonflies and a Little Mimosa

August 26th, 2007

     I took the Yellow Lab out for retrieving work in the pond yesterday, and had to gather up all the duck decoys I had set out… of course they drifted around the pond since I threw them in the deep end, so I had a “decoy roundup” for about an hour.  But I enjoyed walking about and found some more interesting critters along the pond’s edge… the dragonflies were cruising about very quickly!  Most of them wouldn’t sit still long enough to get decent pictures, but I did get a few.  I actually got a picture of a Widow Skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) in flight… pretty neat. 

 Widow Skimmer Dragonfly

   And what I think is a Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) was kind enough to sit still on a small twig while I took its picture.  I’m amazed at the diversity of species that are always around, although it changes throughout the year and season.

Twelve-Spotted Skimmer Dragonfly

   There were dozens of little red dragonflies zipping about everywhere… Are they Eastern Amberwings? (Perithemis tenara).  Maybe, but they were fast… I took a picture of one almost perched on a blade of grass with its reflection in the water, and another cruising by quickly with its reflection too.  Not the best pictures, but they’re pretty neat anyway.

Amberwing DragonflyAnother Amberwing Dragonfly

     Near the barn we have a row of day lily plants, and last year I dug up a Mimosa “volunteer” that I found growing in the row.  I tried to move it somewhere else to grow, but it didn’t take.  Lo and behold, a couple of weeks ago I found a new Mimosa volunteer growing further down the row!  I don’t know if the seeds were in the day lily plants that were transplanted years ago, or if it sprung up from the old rootstock from the Mimosa I dug up last year.  I don’t know what variety it is, and although I like them- they are on the Plant Conservation Alliance’s “Least Wanted” list of invasive plant species.  I also don’t really want this one to grow here because our septic drain line is about 10 feet below it, and I’m concerned the roots might invade the drain field and mess up the septic system.  I’ll probably try to move it again, but last year’s Mimosa “shrub” had enormous roots, and it was only 5 feet tall.  Does anyone think it would not be a problem to move, or even to leave here?  In our area they are not typically invasive, and require moist soil throughout the year for the seeds to become a problem.  Does anyone have experience with Mimosa trees?

A Mimosa tree sprouted this year

3 Responses to “Dragonflies and a Little Mimosa”

  1. Romansa Kemarau | Cuap-cuapnya Elgaon 18 Apr 2011 at 12:14 pm

    […] http://foxhavenjournal.com/2007/08/26/dragonflies-and-a-little-mimosa/ […]

  2. Aliciaon 16 Jun 2012 at 9:34 am

    The Mimosa tree is a very beautiful smelling tree, but it will take over your yard with tree sprouts, also it leaves little seedling packets everywhere. Its messy. Just a warning.

  3. Beauon 19 Jun 2012 at 10:29 pm

    Hi Alicia- I appreciate your observations… I wondered about that, and didn’t allow this one to continue to grow. I see them in the area… guess I’ll enjoy them from a distance! Thanks for coming by :)

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