Quantcast

Ghostly Sentinels and Daffadown Dillies

March 30th, 2008

It would be nice if the rain would pace itself over the next six months.   If you’re from the midwest you know we’re in that cycle of rain every few days that results in very saturated ground.  Which is good for the plants and water table… but not so good for the soil that erodes off the slopes.  What was protected by grass in some areas has now washed away this year, and the challenge will be to grow grass again before the summer heat (and lack of rain) begins again.  But the spring has a wonderful start!

There is beauty in all the rain and moisture.  After a night of rain, the gray morning reveals the trees standing as ghostly sentinels in the fog.

 Trees in the fog at Fox Haven

And a garden angel sleeps peacefully near some new blooming jonquils. I enjoy these smaller cousins of the larger daffodils.  What’s the difference?  Perhaps the old explanation that all jonquils are daffodils, but not all daffodils are jonquils.  If that makes any sense… meaning that they are both of the genus Narcissus, but the jonquils are a separate species of smaller flowers, usually very fragrant.  And of course daffodils are the many larger varities of yellow and white Narcissus that announce spring with fervor! 

Angel sleeping with jonquils

Do you have a different name for daffodils?  Whatever they are called, it’s interesting to read some possible history about the origination of the names:

“The name Daffodil is derived from an earlier “Affodell”, a variant of Asphodel (flowers). The reason for the introduction of the initial “d” is not known, although a probable source is an etymological merging from the Dutch article “de,” as in “De affodil.” From at least the sixteenth century “Daffadown Dilly” or “daffadown dilly” has appeared as a playful synonym of the name.”

As I was writing this the young boy awoke and sat with me looking at the flower pictures.  He remembered picking one of the first daffodils the other day, and told me what I should write… years from now, I hope the strength of his imagination will carry him well, and like the daffodils, to bloom every year and see life anew.

 “The first flowers of the spring ever to be picked in full bloom.”

Daffodils in spring

 

Trackback URI | Comments RSS

Leave a Reply