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Forests in Spring and a Daffydown Basset Hound

April 15th, 2008

There’s almost too many changes to keep up with as spring unfolds. The mornings have almost been in frost, and today is about the latest frost-free date in our area. It’s interesting to see all the trees and flowers blooming and preparing for the same. Last year all the plants were two weeks ahead of this year because of a very warm March, and then we had an early April freeze that wilted all the leaves and flowers, and set everything back almost a month. But it looks like the fruit and flower crops should be fine this year.

You know it’s spring in Missouri when the Serviceberry, Redbud and Dogwood trees bloom. In our area the Servicberry comes first, followed by the Redbuds and then Dogwood trees. The Oaks, Hickories, Ash and other trees are also in various stages of bloom, but they don’t provide the same show of color.

I love how the Serviceberry trees bloom throughout the forest, with dappled white flowers in the understory.

Serviceberry tree blooming in Oak-Hickory forest

Here’s a closeup of the Serviceberry tree flowers. The berries are also an important food for wildlife.

Flowers of Serviceberry tree

But we love our trees and woodlands in Missouri, and appreciate the values that forests provide within the ecosystem.

It’s amazing that over 85% of Missouri’s forests are held in private land ownership. I wonder what the number is nationally? That’s one of many reasons why we appreciate how the Missouri Conservation Department works effectively with landowners to support their needs, as well as the sound management of plant and animal resources. Government mandates for managing a forest or taking care of the land can only go so far. With the support of conservation agencies and forest professionals, landowners are more willing to embrace the responsibility of caring for the future of our forests.

Do you know what tree this is? The flowers are almost ready to bloom. We have them scattered through the landscape, and they too look wonderful in the understory of the forest.

Early flowers of an Eastern Redbud tree

The wildflowers are showing their colors too. Here a Rue Anemone blooms near the base of the trees.

Rue Anemone flower in spring

 

The reflections of the trees in the pond make the landscape seem bigger somehow. In a few weeks green leaves will cover the landscape, and the reflections of the sky will be replaced by shade.

Trees reflecting in pond in spring

And among the daffodils, the elderly Basset Hound sleeps through the afternoon.

Basset Hound sleeping in the Daffodils

3 Responses to “Forests in Spring and a Daffydown Basset Hound”

  1. Ed Abbeyon 16 Apr 2008 at 7:25 am

    Spring for me is the blooming of the Service Berry and Redbud, the answer to your question. Our Redbud was frosted off last year and the way things are looking now, probably will be frosted off again. I hope I don’t have to wait three years to see it bloom.

  2. Beauon 16 Apr 2008 at 10:05 am

    A man who knows his trees :) I hope you get to see them bloom! Amazing that it could be three years?

  3. Ed Abbeyon 16 Apr 2008 at 12:38 pm

    On the plus side, the giant silver maple didn’t produce any seed pods last year to clog up the cracks in my deck and fill up the gutters.

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