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"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
Albert Einstein



Perspectives in Shadow and Light

December 22nd, 2010

Perhaps we’ve turned that corner… passing the shortest day of the year.   Maybe in other ways too?    I had a comment recently from someone enjoying one of my older photos that prompted a little searching around, and smiling at the beauty of life around here just a few years ago.   I found some perspective, of winter shadows and light, from late winter of 2007.  

I love the contrasts between the ice and water, the shadows and patterns from the landscape.  Everything changes, and all is beautiful- even if such moments are fleeting.  It speaks to me of peace and change…  and for how we see and experience the world around us…   and how that world may be viewed in such different ways by different people.  

May you have a Blessed Christmas and Holiday Season, and a wonderful New Year!




First Snowfall for Chickens

December 12th, 2010

 

 

“Uh, well you go first, okay?”…        “Me?! Why me? I don’t know what that stuff is either!”




A Happy Dog…

November 24th, 2010

I am just a happy dog.   I get to play outside, and swim and roll in the grass…   life is great!

 

Those Who Have and Are Serving Still

November 11th, 2010

“Oh, what a glorious morning is this!”  

Samuel Adams to John Hancock, April 19th, 1775 – On hearing gunfire at Lexington

Samuel Adams and John Hancock were en route to Philadelphia as delegates to the Continental Congress and were staying in Lexington at Hancock’s aunts home.  The story is that Paul Revere rode to the house sometime after midnight to warn the two Patriots that British troops were on the way to arrest them and send them to London to be tried for treason.

Men standing guard outside of the home warned Revere that he was making too much noise, and that the two delegates were sleeping.  Revere is said to have replied, “There’ll be noise soon enough! The Regulars are coming!”

Hours later, John Hancock and Samuel Adams watched from a distance when the “shot heard ’round the world” rang out on Lexington Green as Massachusetts Minute Men and British troops exchanged fire in the start of the Revolution.

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So many other mornings, and sunsets through the generations… and those who have served their nation far from home.   

My brother, and many others, are serving still in the Middle East and all around the world. 

Worth reading in USA Today:  “WWII vets still deserve our attention”

“These veterans are leaving us. Now in their 80s and 90s, they are dying at the rate of 797 a day, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.  I urge families to seek out these veterans.  Thank them for their service. Ask them questions.  Let your children listen.”

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From a personal view…

In 1996, I was stationed overseas in Japan,  deployed on board the now decommissioned USS Independence, and flying the F/A-18.  Living and flying in Japan was a wonderful experience, and I had the opportunity to review much of our WWII history in the Pacific.

I will never forget the times our squadron flew to the remote island of Iwo Jima, the site of the famous flag-raising on top of Mount Suribachi.  We flew there to practice landings for a few days before actually flying off the aircraft carrier.   We  would fly to Iwo Jima, rotating aircraft every few days, totaling a week or two with the air wing, and living in a small dormitory.

That tiny island, less than 6 miles in length, and marked by the single prominent volcano was the site of some of the fiercest combat, and most challenging combat efforts of the war in the Pacific.  In all, over 6500 Americans were killed on Iwo Jima, and around 18,000 wounded, most of them Marines.   Around 22,000 Japanese soldiers died in the fighting as well.

When I was visiting, so many years from the scene of that carnage,  many of us would try to explore the island firsthand with few more than a dozen of us there at one time.  I can hardly describe what it felt like to wander off alone on that island, walking through the underbrush and seeing pieces of equipment left forgotten since the war’s end.  A truck tire here, a piece of rusted metal there… And even walking by caves which lay undisturbed for more than a half-century, and said from stories to be filled with remnants of such things as ammunition or eating utensils, or more.  I wouldn’t find out, and was unwilling to walk beyond the sunlight and trespass across thresholds of death.  It was both moving and unsettling.

I woke up early one morning as the sun rose and walked the very beaches where the landings were made some 52 years before.  I walked alone,  into the surf and climbed the steep slope of sand…   they were tiny smooth black pebbles that made your feet  slip with nearly every step, falling to one’s hands and knees to make any progress up the slope of the beach.

There I was in 1997, alone on a piece of beach on a tiny island in the Pacific, trying to scramble up a hill of slippery sand.  In the distance loomed Suribachi, and my heart pounded as I imagined young American soldiers 52 years earlier, weighed down by heavy equipment, trying to scramble up the very same beach- while being shot at from every direction.  I could only imagine what courage it took, and what determination to even keep moving.  I could only imagine that every one of those valiant men knew inside that they had every chance of dying on that island, far from home and family, and many did.

Later I spent a late evening on top of Mount Suribachi with several friends.   Like military folk do, we brought some beer along and each of us quietly surveyed the island from on high as the sun sank slowly beneath the horizon.  It was our way to toast in remembrance to those who were there before, and those who never went home.

I spent many other days flying over that tiny island. Each time I practiced landings in my small fighter jet I would gaze in heartfelt amazement that so many had fought and died over a foothold on such a tiny piece of land…

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November 10th, 2010 marked the 235th Birthday of the United States Marine Corps…

March of the Seasons and Halloween Fun

October 30th, 2010

The days come and go…  I seem to remember one of my grandmothers, while visiting her in a nursing home more than a decade ago.   She kept repeating, “Time and tide waits for no man…”   

And she would smile when I asked how she was.   “About as fine as could be I suppose…  Time and tide waits for no man…” and she would laugh a little.  She was 99 years old, and passed away a few months later.  She had a remarkable memory for verse, poem and song.  One of these days I’ll share some of them.

 We decorated around the house the other night… it was fun.  Putting up spider webs and lights.  I don’t remember such festivities for Halloween while growing up, but that’s okay. 

It was also the first “freeze” of the fall season the other night.  I went around getting the house and a few other things ready this week, and then picking green tomatoes and bell peppers… sad to see the garden fade away, and there’s even some lettuce and beans still growing.   The chickens are having a great time pecking through the litter- they’ll be great to keep the garden area mulched.   A few of the plants were hit pretty hard by the frost. 

Everything changes…   but it looks like the week ahead will be nice still, so we’ve had a gentle transition to colder weather this year.

It’s fun to wander around to see how different the landscape looks.  The leaf colors have given way to browns and yellows.   A lot of leaves on the ground, but the majority are hanging on.  The boy loves to play and the dog is more than willing to accomodate his spirit…

I’m still working on a few things at home that have focused my attention elsewhere this year.   I just haven’t had time to get around and visit, or even get outside as much as I would like.   That will change too eventually!  I hope you are all doing well.   Enjoy the season and have a Happy Halloween…

And late entry,  isn’t this great!?  I strung one of the webs where he wanted it in front of his room. The spider theme was his own idea…  makes for an interesting hallway at night! :)




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